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Can dogs eat corn on the cob? what does science say

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The image of hot, creamy corn on the cob conjures images of lazy grilling and good times. It's certainly a delicacy, but what happens to those discarded cobs? Best to be extra careful as they are a real danger to our dogs. Let's see if dogs can eat corn on the cob.

corn crop corn agriculture field sweet corn agriculture
Best to be extra careful as they are a real danger to our dogs. Let's see if dogs can eat corn on the cob.

© iStock.com/Kwangmoozaa

Is corn on the cob safe for my dog?

No, corn on the cob is not safe for dogs. Although corn is not poisonous, the hard central cob is indigestible, sharp and poses a great choking or intestinal obstruction hazard. Never give your dog corn on the cob. Even shredded corn on the cob is dangerous.

What is corn on the cob?

The cob is the woody central part of the yellow kernel that grows inside the ear of sweet corn. If not harvested, they will eventually fall off, or more likely we will eat them and treat the cobs as trash.

If you've ever eaten corn on the cob, most of you will have seen corn on the cob. Once the sweet yellow corn is gone, you're left with the gray inner stalk, which is the "corn on the cob."

Discarded corn cobs are used in the biofuel industry as cattle feed, cat litter, animal bedding, soil conditioner and environmentally friendly rodenticide, so they are not unused waste. In fact, corn on the cob was turned into a pipe many years ago.

Corn on the cob is sometimes called corn on the cob, and in the UK, corn on the cob may refer to the round bread called a 'corn on the cob'.

When the corn is fully grown, the cobs resemble Styrofoam, but the baby corn is thin and juicy. Dogs can eat corn if it is cooked until soft.

What are the risks of corn on the cob?

dog looking at corn cob
When feeding corn to your dog, be careful not to let them eat the cob, which can lead to choking and intestinal blockage.

©iStock.com/RobertoDavid

Corn cobs are a natural product, and if your dog is happy chewing them into pieces, it may not seem like a risk, but there are some potential risks that come at a high price.

asphyxia

Corn cobs, with or without kernels, are dangerous items for dogs. They are large enough to cause suffocation in the largest breeds. Corn on the cob is dangerous enough on its own, but the risk increases because of our tendency to eat corn on the cob with metal utensils. Skewers and kebabs in corn on the cob present a secondary choking hazard.

Wound

Corn cobs are very sharp and can scratch a dog's mouth, gums, and cause throat or intestinal damage if they enter the stomach.

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Mouth and internal wounds may become infected. Not only is it painful and painful, but it's also very expensive.

internal blockage

Ruminants such as cows and deer can eat corn on the cob because their digestive systems differ from dogs and humans. They easily digest woody corn on the cob, and in fact, the cob is often used as fodder.

Canines, by contrast, cannot digest fibrous corn cobs, making them a huge clogging hazard. Unless the dog can pass the stick in the stool, it is sitting in the bowel or stomach with an intestinal obstruction.

Dogs are able to chew corn on the cob, and they'll love getting stuck, but they won't be able to digest the ingested pieces.

burn

Many of us know that corn on the cob retains a ferocious heat, especially if it's grilled straight up. Dogs can get burned by corncobs, which can damage their mouths and lead to infections.

Butter and Dressings

Corn on the cob is delicious when dipped in hot butter and salt, but these are not healthy for dogs. Butter or other oils contain fat, which can lead to obesity if eaten regularly. High-fat foods can also cause painful conditions such as pancreatitis. Pancreatitis is when the pancreas digests itself. This can be very painful for both humans and dogs.

There are also condiments such as garlic butter or fried onions associated with corn on the cob. This is a problem because shallots are poisonous to dogs — more on that later.

What are the health benefits of corn on the cob?

Giving dogs corn on the cob is too risky to provide health benefits, but corn without the cob is good for dogs and provides several nutrients.

  • Protein – builds healthy muscles, skin and coat. It also repairs damaged muscles
  • Carbohydrates – Corn provides a low-fat energy source that keeps dogs energized
  • Linoleic acid – an omega fatty acid that boosts the immune system and maintains a smooth coat and healthy skin
  • Antioxidants – Key antioxidants protect the body from cellular damage
  • Beta-carotene – essential for good vision and a strong immune system
  • Fiber – Fiber supports bowel health and bowel regularity.

Can Dogs Eat Corn?

dog eats corn
Giving dogs corn on the cob is too risky to provide health benefits, but corn without the cob is good for dogs and provides several nutrients.

©iStock.com/Firn

Yes, dogs can eat loose corn. Corn is a healthy addition to a dog's diet, and they are omnivores after all, so healthy, nontoxic fruits and vegetables are great treats for our canine companions. If your dog is eating a well-rounded, high-quality commercial dog food, he won't need the extra corn, but it's nice to give them a little treat sometimes. The ASPCA recommends that treats make up no more than 10% of a dog's daily diet, so don't overeat!

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How about canned sweet corn?

Canned sweet corn is fine for dogs but should be drained and rinsed first. This is because canned sweet corn is kept in various liquids, such as brine. Salt intake can lead to high blood pressure and dehydration in dogs.

Canned corn should be plain, anything extra like garlic, sugar or spices is out of the question.

My dog ate a corn on the cob what should I do?

If your dog chokes on a corncob, immediate first aid can save their life. The deletion method is as follows:

Leash your dog, open his mouth and swipe your finger to clear any obstructions. If you can't reach it, grab it with pliers or even pliers, but don't press down any further.

If you can't reach the corn on the cob, you must perform the Heimlich maneuver. This is the same one you use on choked people.

  • The puppy can be picked up on your lap with the head down and the belly up. Push hard with your fist against their head in the soft hollow just below their ribcage.
  • Large dogs can land on their side. Put yourself on their back and drive your fist hard into the hollow just below their rib cage, moving up towards their head.

Use quick, quick movements as this will expel air from their lungs and hopefully expel the cobs. After a choking incident, be sure to get a veterinary checkup.

If your dog isn't choking, he's not out of the woods yet. It is important to monitor your dog closely. Some people are able to pass cobs in their stools, but because they are difficult to digest, they can get stuck and cause a life-threatening blockage.

Check your dog's stool for corncob residue (they can take up to 72 hours to pass), but be sure to see your veterinarian if they show the following signs of blockage.

  • disease
  • diarrhea
  • lethargy
  • straining to defecate
  • loss of appetite
  • stomach or abdominal pain

What foods are poisonous to dogs?

poisonous food for dogs with grapes
There are several foods that can poison dogs.

© iStock.com/humonia

Corn is not poisonous, but several foods can poison dogs. They include:

Artificial Sweetener Xylitol

This common addition to jellies, cakes, cookies, Haribo, and sweet treats can cause a large drop in blood sugar and potential hypoglycemia in dogs.

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grapes and raisins

The fruit can cause kidney failure, but experts aren't sure exactly what causes it. Grapes, raisins, juice, and wine of all colors are poisonous.

chocolate

They may like the sweetness, but dark, milk and, to a lesser extent, white all contain theobromine and caffeine, stimulants that can cause organ failure. Chocolate may also contain xylitol.

Macadamia

Often baked into cakes and cookies, these nuts are prime snack targets on the kitchen counter. Macadamia nut compounds are not digestible and can cause organ failure.

Black walnut

Black walnuts contain indigestible compounds and often develop a mold that is toxic to dogs.

Garlic, Onion, Chives, Shallots

Onions are poisonous to dogs. They contain compounds that bind to red blood cells and cause anemia.

Corn on the cob is dangerous for dogs

So, we know that corn is not poisonous to dogs, and in fact loose corn is good for health, but corn on the cob is dangerous.

They pose a serious choking hazard and, because they are not easily digested, can cause intestinal blockage. No matter how much your dog likes to chew corn on the cob, it's not worth the risk.

Grilling is prime time for dogs to get caught on the cob, requiring the kind of bank-breaking surgery we all hope to avoid, or worse, dying by suffocation.

Dogs and corn on the cob don't mix! If you want your dog to eat sweet corn, make it the loose kind, wrap the cobs, and seal them in a trash can that the dog can't get into, or place up high out of reach.

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Should dogs be able to eat corn on the cob?

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about the author

Becky Matthews


I have been a professional writer since 2014 with a special interest in the environment, especially archeology and plant species. I graduated from the University of Reading and Oxford University in the UK.

FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

Can You Feed Your Dog Corn On The Cob?

Giving dogs corn on the cob is too risky to provide health benefits, but corn without the cob is good for dogs and provides several nutrients.

Can Dogs Eat Canned Corn?

Canned sweet corn is fine for dogs but should be drained and rinsed first. This is because canned sweet corn is kept in various liquids, such as brine. Salt intake can lead to high blood pressure and dehydration in dogs.

Thanks for reading! Have some feedback for us? Contact the 10hunting.com editorial team.

source
  1. British Veterinary Association, available here: https://www.bva.co.uk/news-and-blog/news-article/keep-corn-on-the-cob-away-from-your-dog- surge-vets
  2. SmokeKing, available here: https://www.smoke-king.co.uk/pipes/missouri-meerschaum-corn-cob-smoking-pipes
  3. RSPCA, available here: https://www.rspca.org.uk/adviceandwelfare/pets/dogs/health/firstaid