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Puggle vs Pug: What's the Difference?

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There are many beloved crossbreed dogs in the world today, but what's the difference between a Puggle and a Pug? You probably already know that the Puggle is a cross between a Beagle and a Pug, but how does this dog compare to the traditional standard purebred Pug? They may have more in common than you think, but what makes them different?

In this article, we'll break down all the details about these two types of dogs, including their size and appearance, so you can see how to tell them apart. We'll also discuss their ancestry and reproduction, as well as their behavioral differences and lifespan. Now let's talk about Puggles and Pugs!

Comparing Puggle and Pug

pug to pug
Puggles are larger than pugs in both height and weight.

© AZ-Animals.com

pug dog pug dog
size 13-15 inches tall; 25-30 lbs 10-13 inches tall; 14-20 lbs
appearance Long, floppy ears that come in a variety of colors including fawn, red, black, white, and tan. Longer nose than a pug and overall thinner Found only in fawn and black; wrinkled face and lots of wrinkles. Ears end close to the eyeline and are floppy. Dark markings on the face and around the ears
ancestor Modern breed; between pug and beagle and generally healthier Ancient breed originally bred for royalty and pugs; purebred dogs and popular pets
Behavior Gets well with children and family; very eager to please and energetic. Fewer health problems than pugs Calm and round; accustomed to sleeping next to humans frequently. May have more health problems than the average dog due to facial development
life 12-15 years old 10-14 years old

Key Differences Between Puggle and Pug

pug vs pug
Pugs have a shorter nose and a flatter face compared to the face of a pug.

© Khilenko Anastasiia/Shutterstock.com

There are a number of key differences between a Puggle and a Pug. Puggles are larger than pugs in both height and weight. Pugs have a shorter nose and a flatter face compared to the face of a pug. Also, the pug breed is an ancient dog breed while the pug is a more modern crossbreed. Finally, Puggles live on average longer than Pugs due to a healthier breed.

Let us now discuss all these differences in more detail.

Puggle vs Pug: Size

pug vs pug
The average pug weighs 14-20 pounds, while the pug weighs 25-30 pounds, depending on the gender.

Given that the Puggle is a pug-beagle cross, you can guess without a doubt that the average Puggle is larger than the average pug. Puggles have longer and leaner bodies than pugs, and Puggles are a fair amount taller than pugs. For example, pugs are between 13-15 inches tall, while the average pug is 10-13 inches tall.

Pugs also tend to weigh more than pugs given the Beagle's pedigree. The average pug weighs 14-20 pounds, while the pug weighs 25-30 pounds, depending on the gender. When looking at these two dogs side by side, you might say that Puggles are bigger than Pugs.

Puggle vs Pug: Appearance

pug vs pug
The Puggle's nose is more elongated compared to the pug's squashed nose.

© Nature Art/Shutterstock.com

Another difference between a Puggle and a Pug is their appearance. Pugs come in far fewer colors than Puggles. These colors include black and fawn, while Puggles come in fawn, red, black, white and tan. However, the most obvious difference between Puggles and Pugs is the shape of their noses, or muzzles.

The Puggle's nose is more elongated compared to the pug's squashed nose. Both dogs have wrinkled faces and bodies, but Puggle's body is leaner compared to the pug's compact body. Also, a Puggle's ears are usually longer than a Pug's, but this depends on the dog's genetics.

Puggle vs Pug: Ancestry and Breeding

pug vs pug
Puggles are a combination of pugs and beagles, while Pugs are always purebred dogs.

© sirtravelalot/Shutterstock.com

You're sure to know that pugs are purebred dogs, but Puggles are not. In reality, Puggles are a cross between a Pug and a Beagle, and Pugs have always been purebreds. The pug breed originated a long time ago and they were regarded as pugs and companion animals in royal families. Puggles are bred to resemble pugs, but are generally healthier due to their beagle genes.

Puggle vs Pug: Behavior

pug vs pug
While this isn't necessarily a behavior issue, Puggles have fewer health problems than the average Pug.

© iStock.com/nothjc

There are some behavioral differences between pugs and pugs. Pugs generally like to sleep and be close to their owners, while Puggles are generally more active. In fact, Puggles are friendly and easy to train, making them perfect for families with young children. Pugs in general are not always fond of young children, and pugs are very patient dogs.

While this isn't necessarily a behavior issue, Puggles have fewer health problems than the average Pug. Many pugs suffer from respiratory problems due to their breeding and facial structure, while pugs do not have the same health problems.

Puggle vs Pug: Lifespan

pug vs pug
Puggles have an average lifespan of 12-15 years, while Pugs live 10-14 years, depending on their individual breed and health.

©anetapics/Shutterstock.com

One final difference between Puggles and Pugs is the lifespan of these two types of dogs. Puggles live on average longer than the average Pug, though not by many years. The two dogs have a similar lifespan, but pugs are generally healthier than pugs due to the breed and genetics of the beagle. Now let's take a closer look at the numbers.

Puggles have an average lifespan of 12-15 years, while Pugs live 10-14 years, depending on their individual breed and health. Given the size of these two dogs, it's important to maintain an exercise schedule and a healthy meal plan, especially for your pet pug!

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featured image

Pug (Canis familiaris) - lying on the ground against white background

© Pavel Hlystov/Shutterstock.com


about the author

august croft


I am a non-binary freelance writer working full time in Oregon. A graduate of Southern Oregon University with a BA in Theater and a major in Creative Writing, I have an interest in a variety of topics, especially the history of the Pacific Northwest. When I'm not writing personally or professionally, you can find me camping on the Oregon coast with my high school sweetheart and Chihuahua mix, or in my family's kitchen, perfecting recipes in a gleaming cast-iron skillet.

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